Rehearsal for Royal Ballet Performance!!

Some cameo appearances in a current dance project with the Royal Ballet and QPAC.
#thewinterstsle #shakespeare #brisbanedance

We All Dance! Queensland community groups are busy exploring the transformative powers of dance, in a special collaboration with London’s Royal Ballet and local teaching artists.
Discover more about the We All Dance project at http://atqp.ac/2szl58x

We All Dance culminates in a FREE performance, at QPAC Sun 2 July, 4:30pm – 5:30pm.

Cairns community groups will perform as part of the ticketed Royal Ballet Gala performance, Wed 12 July, from 5pm.

 

Ramadan Reflection

18670814_10155461108977033_1017131430764402595_n

My best wishes and solidarity to my Muslim friends during this holy time of Ramadan.

May we who are not Muslim fast from prejudice, misinformation and ignorance about our sisters and brothers of Islam.

May we who are not Muslim be generous in our willingness to understand this faith and welcome this community into our neighbourhoods.

May we who are not Muslim take time to reflect, pray and be still with the wonder of faith that calls all people to peace, collaboration, respect and love.

 

Worth reading

Franciscan Message for the Month of Ramadan

Christian-Muslim Relations

Pope to Muslims for end of Ramadan: Promoting Mutual Respect through Education (2013)

National Reconciliation Week 2017

National Reconciliation Week (NRW) 2017

The theme for #NRW2017 is ‘Let’s Take the Next Steps’.

National Reconciliation Week (NRW) runs annually from 27 May – 3 June. These dates mark two milestones in Australia’s reconciliation journey: The 1967 referendum and the historic Mabo decision, respectively.

In 2017, we reflect on two significant anniversaries in Australia’s reconciliation journey – 50 years since the 1967 referendum, and 25 years since the historic Mabo decision. As we commemorate these significant milestones, we ask all Australians to be a part of the next big steps in our nation’s reconciliation journey.

You can now download the poster here. More digital resources will be available to download here in the coming weeks.

For updates on #NRW2017, sign up to our email newsletter by entering your email address at the bottom of the page, and keep an eye on our Facebook and Twitter.

Reclaiming May in Catholicism

serversmallAs a young boy I was fully inducted into my privileged state  in the Catholic Church. I was a altar server which meant I had access to the sacred in ways that my revered grandmother would never know.I was taught the ritual language of Latin and dressed in robes that marked me off from others in the Church.

The elite male caste of clericalism is one that can easily trap a young boy with religious interest,imagination and dreams of adventure. Although I had my share of comic book heroes, some of whom were military monsters, I also read of the martyrs and wonder workers of my faith tradition who ranged from the hard working to the eccentric. Few of these stories were of women whether  in comic books or biographies of saints.

I spent a number of years as a young adult within this culture of male clericalism. I learnt much from this  experience. My choices meant that I lived in a  multicultural religious community of men. This nurtured a  new appreciation of cultural diversity that has stayed with me since.It also gave me insights into masculinity that have led me to a new understanding of my sexuality as a gay man.

My passion for social justice led me to an awareness that at the core of my life was a deep injustice both personal and systemic. It was an injustice deeply rooted in  the very culture I had taken on board as my  source of meaning and fulfillment.

Patriarchy is the elephant in the room of Catholicism and much of Christianity.In my younger days I took it for granted that males had rights and privileges.When I was a young altar boy there was one Sunday in the year when girls took centre stage in the Church.

The annual crowning of Our Lady’s statue was a high  religious festival in May. It involved  flowers, lyrical songs and young girls dressed in white strewing rose petals on the nave of the Church, There was even a “WHS” factor ignored at the time, when one  special girl in full white wedding gear had to climb a ladder to place a wreath of flowers on the head of the statue. Many observers would see the day as a bit of Goddess worship Catholic style where women had their  15 minutes of religious fame. But after all the processing and drama of the crowning we went back to hearing a male priest tell of the glory of Mary.

In  2012  the NCR  published one of the best pieces of writing I have ever read by Sr Joan Chittester : Silence about the global treatment of women is disquieting. Chittester concludes this item with this call:

From where I stand, it seems to me that male “protection,” paternalism and patriarchal theology are not to be trusted anymore because the actions it spawns in both men and women have limited the full humanity of women everywhere, and on purpose.


Isn’t it time for us all to really be converted, to say the real Truth about women from our pulpits, from our preachers, from our patriarchs, until both they and we finally believe it ourselves? Then surely the actions that make it real will follow.

I am all for keeping May as a month of “woman awareness”. I believe we should rediscover the mythology and person of Mary of Nazareth in our day. My preferred text for such an approach is Marina Warner’s “Alone of All Her Sex: The Myth and Cult of the Virgin Mary“. It speaks with far more religious and feminine insight the Louis de Montfort’s True Devotion to Mary.

I have  my own Marian Shrine in the back garden. “Our Lady of the Milk Crate” is a local devotion inspired by the appearances of Mary at Coogee Beach. Readers may be surprised to know that the Virgin Mary had made an earlier visit to Coogee in 1911 to a young woman, Eileen O’Connor who founded Australia’s Brown Nurses.


On a practical and pastoral response perhaps our Churches could begin by recognizing May as Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Month with the same enthusiasm that goes into devotions to the Fatima visions.

My many women friends continue to challenge me into the full maturity of my masculinity. I recall with gratitude the women of global influence I have been privileged to meet or know online and through their writings. I honour the work of Dorothy Day, Jean Houston, Helen Prejean, Pauline Coll, Julia Cameron. Marina Warner, Janet McKenzie,   Mirium Therese WinterOdetta, Sweet Honey in the Rock, Maureen Watson, Oodgeroo  Noonuccal  Mirium Rose Ungunmerr Baumann and so many more.

Neighbours on the Boundary

IMAG0559

A Photographic Exhibition to Celebrate  Neighbour Day 2017 in West End

Dates: 26th March – Late  April

Venue: Hope Street Cafe 170 Boundary Street West End

This exhibition celebrates Neighbour Day 2017 on 26th March. It features people for whom Boundary Street is a neighbourhood of life, work, relaxation, shopping , celebration, and friendships.


Boundary Street is a neighbourhood that embraces diversity. Shopfronts tell stories of the old and new cultures that have made a home here. Private homes and public space sit side by side. Street signs tell the history of a colonial presence on ancient land of the Jagera and Turrbal peoples
This exhibition is running conjunction with an online exhibition and a Facebook Collection 

cropped-img_4898.jpgTony Robertson is a Brisbane photographer whose works in the tradition of social documentary and storytelling. His folio of images includes, political rallies, cultural celebrations and memorials for bereaved communities.

The exhibition will include a series of “Meet the Photographer Events so come back and check on dates and times!!
#neighbourday

Christmas 2016

May the ancient story of a child born in occupied territory open our hearts to the work of defending human rights.

May the birth of every child call us to our communal responsibility to protect children, to take them on wild adventures and to let them grow into the unique person they are called to be.

May the image of a family forced to seek refuge and asylum far from their home inform our political choices as citizens of a global village.

May our messages of good wishes and happy holidays not blind us to the work of justice making and non-violence.

May the lights and decorations of the season remind us of our mission to bring light to the darkness and celebration to life.

May our gifting be generous as we remember those who live in situations of poverty and exploitation.

May we hear angelic voices singing our dream of peace on earth

Image is the work of Mark Knight cartoonist at The Herald Sun in Melbourne